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Nation​​​al AYUSH Mission (NAM)

State Annual Action Plan – Medicinal Plants

 

1.           Background information

In recent years, there has been a tremendous growth of interest in plant-based drugs and pharmacuiticals in the world.  The availability of plant based materials is mainly from the natural sources like forests and waste lands.  But, due to the ever increasing utilisation of land for food crops, devastation of forests and the concurrent indiscriminate exploitation of these crops, their availability from natural sources has declined;  on the other hand the demand for internal as well as for export has been increasing, necessitating the production of medicinal crops on a large scale.  There is need to introduce these crops into the cropping systems which, besides meeting the demands of the industry, will also help to maintain the standards on quality, potency and chemical composition.

In order to create an infrastructure for processing, storage, value addition, area expansion through cultivation and production of genuine quality planting materials, an annual action plan in detail for the year 2015-16 under the Centrally Sponsored Scheme of National AYUSH Mission for the component Medicinal Plants has been prepared by the implementing agency .i.e, Department of Horticulture, Government of Karnataka.

​1.1         Geography and climate

Karnataka, blessed with a variety of climatic conditions.  It is one of the immensely potential states for the development of medicinal plants.  The tropical forests of Western Ghats and deciduous forests of Deccan plateau rich in medicinal plant Biodiversity which more than 2500 species of plants.  The state witnesses three climatic types such as tropical monsoon which covers entire coastal belt and adjoining areas, the southern half of state, outside the coastal belt experiences hot, seasonally hot, seasonally dry tropical savana climate and the remaining regions of the southern half of the state experiences hot, semi-arid, tropical steppe type of climate.

1.1.1.    Geography for whole-state and proposed area/cluster to be covered under the action plan.

Karnataka is India's eighth largest state in terms of geographical size (191791 sq.km.)  The state has 30 Districts and 177 Taluks.  Among these 10 districts have been proposed to be covered under this scheme during 2015-16 with an outlay of Rs. 137.27 lakhs.

1.1.2.    Agro-climatic zones : Type of soils, climate-season, minimum maximum temperatures, rainfall-pattern of rainfall in the state/project area.

Sl NoAgro-Climatic zonesTalukRainfall (mm)Type of soils
1North eastern transitionAland, Bhalki, Basavakalyan, Bidar, Chincholi, Humnabad, Aurad829.5 to 919.00Shallow to medium blak clay soils in major areas. Red lateritic soils in remaining areas.
2North Eastern Dry ZoneAfzalpur, Chitapur, Gulbarga, Jewargi, Sedam, Shorapur, Shahapur, Yadgir, Raichur, Devdurga, Manvi633.22 to 806.6Deep to very deep black clay soils in major areas.  Shallow to medium black soils in minor pockets.
3Northern Dry ZoneGangavathi, Koppal, Kushtagi, Lingasur, Sindhanur, Yelbarga, Badami, Bagalkote, Bagewadi, Bilgi, Bijapur, Hungund, Indi, Jamkhandi, Mudhol, Muddebhihal, Sindagi, Bellary, Hagaribommanahalli, Harappanahalli, Hadagali, Hospet, Kudligi, Sandhr, Siruguppa, Ron, Navalgund, Naragund, Gadag, Mundargi, Ramdurga, Gokak, Raibag, Soundatti, Athani.464.5 to 785.7Deep to very deep black clay soils in major areas.  Shallow to medium black soils in minor pockets.
4Central Dry ZoneChallakere, Chitradurga, Davanagere, Harihara, Hosadurga, Holalkere, Jagalur, Molakalmur, Arsikere, Kadur, Madhugiri, Pavagada, Koratagere, CN Halli, Sira, Tiptur455.5 to 717.4Red Sandy loams in major areas, shallow to deep black soil in remaining areas.
5Eastern Dry ZoneGubbi, Tumkur, Anekal, Bangalore-N, Bangalore-S, Channapatna, Devanahally, Doddaballapur, Hoskote, Kanakapura, Magadi, Nelamangala, Ramanagar, Bagepalli, Bangarpet, Chikkaballapur, Chintamani, Gudibande, Gowribidanur, Kolar, Malur, Mulbaghal, Shidlaghatta, Srinivasapur679.1 to 888.9Red loamy soils in major areas, clay lateritic soils in remaining areas.
6Southern Dry ZoneK.R. Nagar, T. Narasipur, Mysore, Kollegal, Nanjangud, Turuvekere, Kunigal, Nagamangala, Srirangapatna, Malavalli, Maddur, Mandya, Pandavapura, K.R. Pet, Channarayapatna, Hassan, Chamarajnagar, Yelandur, Gundlupet.670.6 to 888.6Red sandy loams in major areas and remaining areas, pockets of black soils.
7Southern Transition ZoneH.D. Kote, Hunsur, Piriyapatna, H.N. Pura, Alur, Arkalgud, Tarikere, Bhadravathi, Shimoga, Honnali, Shikaripura, Channagiri.611.7 to 1053.9Red sandy loams in major areas and in remaining areas, red loamy soils.
8Northern Transition zoneHukkeri, Chikkodi, Bailhongal, Belgaum, Haveri, Shiggaon, Shirahatti, Kundagol, Savanur, Hubli, Dharwad, Byadgi, Hirekerur, Ranibennur618.4 to 1303.2Shallow to medium black clay soils and red sandy loamy soils in equal proportion.
9Hilly ZoneSirsi, Siddapur, Yellapur, Supa, Haliyal, Mundgod, Khanapur, Soraba, Thirthahally, Koppa, Sringeri, Mudigere, Narasimharajapura, Chickmagalur, Kalaghatgi, Hanagal, Sakleshpur, Virajpet, Somwarpet, Madikeri904.4 to 3695.1Red clay loamy soils in major areas.
10Coastal zoneKarwar, Kumta, Honnavar, Bhatkal, Ankola, Bantwal, Udupi, Belthangadi, Karkala, Kundapur, Mangalore, Puttur, Sulya3010.9 to 4694.4Red lateritic and costal alluvial.

 

Rainfall patern

The state receives 80% of the annual rainfall in the southwest monsoon period, 12% in the post-monsoon period, 7% in the summer and only 1% in winter.  There are two major rainfall deficit areas in the state with annual rainfall of 500-600mm, both lying in north interior Karnataka, one covering Bijapur, east Belgaum, north-east Dharwad and the west Raichur districts and the other east Bellary and Chitradurga district and a small portion of Tumkur District.  The rainy season is spread over a period of four months (June-September) in the coastal, Ghats, malnad areas and in Bidar District, while over the maidan areas it is spread over a period of five to seven months.  The districts which have a long spell of rainfall, are Hassan, Mysore, Tumkur and Chitradurga.

​​Suitability of crops proposed in the plan with refeence to Agro-climatic zones

The dissemination of knowledge on aspects of cultivation, harvesting and storage of medicinal plants would go a long way in meeting quality standards and generating economic returns to farmers.  Medicinal plants have a wide adaptibility and can be seen growing  throughout the length and breadth of the State.  To ensure the production of quality planting materials as well as quality raw material periodical training cum interactions on medicinal plants including cultivation, post harvest management (PHM), processing, marketing etc need to be organised at cluster level.

Detail on suitability of crops agro-climate zonewise in Karnataka is given below

Sl NoName of the cropDistrict
1SandalwoodShimoga, Chickmagalur
2Gloriosa superbaUttara Kannada, Udupi, Shimoga, Dakshina Kannada
3AshokaDakshina Kannada, Uttar Kannada, Udupi, Shimoga
4AmlaThroughout Karnataka
5SteviaBangalore, Kolar, Chikkaballapura, Ramanagar, Tumkur, Chamarajanagar, Mandya, Mysore, Chitradurga, Davanagere, Koppal
6Aloe veraThroughout Karnataka
7TulsiThrought Karnataka excluding Udupi, Uttar Kannada, Dhakshina Kannada
8HippaliThrought Karnataka
9NeemThroughout Karnataka
10AswagandhaGadag, Koppal, Bellary, Raichur, Bagalkote, Bijapura, Dharwad, Chitradurga, Tumkur, Davanagere, Mandya, Kolar, Bangalore, Chickballapur
11BajeThroughout Karnataka
12BrahmiThroughout Karnataka
13ColeusTumkur, Bidar, Bijapur, Belgaum, Mysore, Uttar Kannada, Mandya, Chitradurga, Tumkur, Kolar, Mandya, Bijapur, Bagalkote, Chikkaballapur, Davanagere, Raichur, Bellary
14Bael (Belva)Chitradurga, Tumkur, Kolar, Mandya, Bijapur, Bagalkote, Chikkaballapur, Davanagere, Raichur, Bellary
15SarpagandhaChikkamagalur, Dakshinaka Kannada, Uttar Kannada, Kodagu, Belgaum, Mysore
16CinnamomumUttar Kannada, Dakshina Kannada, Uttara Kannada, Kodagu, Belgaum, Mysore
17KokumUttara Kannada, Dakshina Kannada, Udupi, Chickmagalur, Shimoga, Kodagu, Mysore, Tumkur, Mandya, Bangalore, Hassan, Shimoga, Belgaum, Uttar Kannada, Dakshina Kannada, Davanagere, Dharwad, Bangalore.
18KalmeghUttara Kannada, Dakshina Kannada, Udupi, Chickmagalur, Shimoga, Kodagu, Belgaum, Uttar Kannada, Dakshina Kannada, Davanagere, Dharwad, Bangalore.
19GuggalThroughout Karnataka excluding Udupi, Uttarkannada, Dakshina Kannada, Hassan, Chickmagalur
20AgarwoodChikkamagalur, Uttara Kannada, Kodagu, Shimoga
21Red sandersShimoga, Chickmagalur

 

Socio-economic profile of the Project Area

Karnataka, India's eighth largest state in terms of geographical size (1,91,791 sq.km.) is home to 6.11 crore people (2011 census).  The state has 30 districts and 177 taluks.  State's Gross State Domestic Product (GSDP) growth rate has lagged behind the countries growth rate in the tenth plan and average growth rate during the tenth plan was 7.2%.

Forest covers 18.38 percent of the total states geographical area and horticulture cover an area of 18.85 lakh hectares in the state with a production of 155.01 lakh tonnes.

It is interesting to note that there are more than 12 lakh familities mainly depending on Horticulture for their livelihood in the State;  besides 2-3 lakh familiites were partly dependent.  Nearly, 60 lakh people are directly and indirectly engaged in various activities encompassing the area like nursery, production, post-production, marketing, value addition and export.

1.2. Potential

Karnataka is one of the largest producers of essential oils, high value perfumery products and food flavours in the Country.  It is the largest producer of sandalwood, Bursera and Davana oils and producer of other oils like Lemongrass, Citronella, Palma Rosa, Jasmine, Tuberose and Vettiver in substantial qualtities.  Besides, State has also more potentiality to take up cultivation of medicinal plants such as Sandal, Ashwagandha, Tulsi, Stevia, Pachouli, Bail, Gloriosa, Aloe vera, Salcia, Amta, Andrographis, Guggal, Acorus, Coleus etc.

1.2.1.    Baseline survey

As per the survey conducted under National Horticulture Mission, Department of Horticulture, Government of Karnataka, the total area under cultivation of medicinal plants was 2420 ha and annual production was 4101 MT.  There are more than 55 companies/agencies involved in large scale processing, value addition and marketing of medicinal products in the State.  In addition, there are more than hundred small scale entrepreneurs involved in herbal formulation and marketing.

Important medicinal plants like Sandalwood, Ashwagandha, Tulsi, Coleus, Amla, Safedmusli, Aloevera, Acorus calamus, Kalmeg, Senna, Muccuna prurita etc. have been taken up under the Central sponsored scheme of National Mission on Medicinal Plants since inception to till date.

1.2.2.    Market survey

Data on export and import markets, potential players, infrastructure facilities available for post harvest management, availability of raw material, planting materials production units etc. to be collected from each project district under this scheme.

1.3 Existing Infrastructure (with reference to medicinal plants/produce)

1.3.1.    Nurseries

In Karnataka, state departments of Horticulture and Forest and Universities of Agriculture Sciences (UAS's), University of Horticultural Sciences (UHS), Krishi Vignana Kendras (KVK's), Research Institutions such as Indian Institute of Horticulture (IIHR), Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromotic Plants (CIMAP) have already been involved in production of genuine planting materials.

The Department of Horticulture has established as many as 410 Horticulture Farms/Nurseries and the Department of Forest has established more than 250 nurseries, which are spread over throughout the length and breadth of the State.  In addition, University of Agriculture Sciences (2 Nos), Krishi Vignana Kendras' (KVKs) 27 no's, CIMAP (1 no) IIHR (1 no) and Dhanwantri Bangalore University (1 No) have also involved in rising various medicinal plants in their nurseries based on the need of the farmers.

The medicinal plants species such as Sandalwood, Amla, Gloriosa, Dalchini, Salacia, Gareinia, Sweet flag, Bilva, Brahmi, Aloevara, Gundmar, Kalihari, Kokum, Lemon grass, Pachouli, Pippali, Sarpagandha, Stevia, Shatavari, etc. are being raised in private and public nurseries in the State.

39 nurseries have been established at different locations for production of genuine planting materials of medicinal plants under the scheme of National Mission on Medicinal Plants since 2008-09.

There are private agencies (about 40) involved in raising of various medicinal plants which are in demand along with seedlings of other plant species in the state.

1.3.2.    Warehousing and cold storage

The growth of cold storage industry in Karnataka is achieving significant progress keeping pace with its demand to match the protection.  As far as total production of horticulture produce is concerned, the available capacity is insufficient.

1.3.3.    Transportation facility

Good transportation facility is available in the state.

1.3.4.    Processing Units

There are more than 55 companies/agencies involved in large scale processing, value addition and marketing of medicinal plants products in the State.  In addition, there are more than hundred small scale entrepreneurs involved in herbal formulation and marketing.

The processing units namely, Himalayan drugs, Natural Remedies, Sami Lab, Prakruti Pvt Limited, Sadvaidya Shala, Phaladhai Foundation have been involved in processing of raw materials on a larger scale and encouraging farmers to take up cultivation of medicinal plants in the State.

1.3.5.    Markets

Karnataka is a progressive state having favourable agro-climatic conditions for cultivating wide range of medicinal plants such as, Ashwagandha, Amla, Stevia, Aloe vera, Coleus, Gloriosa etc and are being cultivated and marketed.  However, there is a need to create marketing facility on scientific lines.  This would help in increasing the confidence of the farmers to take up cultivation of medicinal plants.

1.3.6.    Research and development

In order to bridge the gap between farmers and research and development institutions for providing technical information and extension support on cultivation, processing and marketing of medicinal plants in the state, the following research and development institutions/agencies are functioning.

  • University of Horticultural Sciences, Bagalkot
  • University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore and Dharwad
  • Central Institute for Medicinal and Aromatic Plants (CIMAP), Bangalore
  • Indian Institute of Horticulture Research (IIHR), Bangalore
  • Biocentre, Department of Horticulture, Bangalore
  • Research Division, Department of Forest, Bangalore
  • Foundation for Revitalisation of Local Health Traditions (FRLHT), Bangalore.
1.3.7. ​Status of power, irrigation, labour and other supporting infrastructure/services required.

In the state, the agriculture by and large is still dependent on rainfall and determines the production.  The major sources of irrigation for agriculture and horticulture development are dams and tanks irrigations, borewells and open wells for irrigation.  The following infrastructure/services are required to bridge the information gap and technical support for cultivation, processing and value addition and marketing of medicinal plants.

  • Development of nurseries for production of quality planting materials.
  • Financial assistance for farmers to take up cultivation of medicinal plants which are in high demand in domestic as well as in international markets.
  • Infrastructure development for post harvest management including drying sheds, storage godowns etc. at cluster level.
  • Establishment and strengthening of processing and value addition infrastructures including processing unit, setting up of resting laboratories organic/GAP certification, crop insurance etc.
  • Assistance for building the capacities of growers and manufacturers of medicinal plants.
  • Financial assitance for developing market facilities, buy back arrangements, market intelligence etc.
  • Financial support for formation of village level institutions and federating those institutions at taluks/district level to establish liaisons with line departments for convergence of other schemes and for loan facilities with respect to medicinal plants.
1.3.8.    List of farmers' Association, Cooperatives, SHGs, NGOs in the project area

There are about 250 non-Governmental Organisations, 2 lakh Self Help Groups, 800 farmers' associations/clubs and 100 Cooperatives functioning in the proposed project districts.  Most of these institutions are being involved in capacity building of farming community, awareness creation, cultivation and marketing of raw materials of the medicinal plants.  Th validation and updating of specific information on institutions involved in cultivation, processing and marketing will be done concurrently with the implementation of medicinal plants scheme.

1.3.9.    Waste land available (Ha)

Estimates of wastelands in Karnataka is 71.22 lakh hectares of which 4.04 lakh hectare areas is suffering from problem of salinity and alkalinity and 67.18 lakh hectares is water eroded area.  The data on waste land available in the proposed project districts will have to be collected.

​​1.4. Land availability (cluster wise)
1.5. Existing level of cultivation

1.5.1.    Cropwise cultivation

In the state, medicinal plants cultivation is taken up as sole/exclusive crop or as mixed crop.  crops like Aloe Vera, Ashwagandha, Amla, Senna, Stevia and Safed musli etc are being grown as single crops and crops like sandal wood, Asoka etc are taken up as mixed crops.

1.5.2.    Productivity level – existing and potential

Karnataka is one of the largest producers of essential oils, high value perfumery products and food flavours in the Country.  It is the largest producer of sandal wood, Bursera and Davana oils and producer of other oils like Lemongrass, Citronella, Palma Rosa, Jasmine, Tuberose and Vettiver in substantial quantities.

1.5.3.    Follow up : GAP, GACP

In order to ensure the success of implementation of the activities proposed under the scheme during the year 2014-15, the follow up actions will be initiated at the cluster level.  This would enable the beneficiaries to adopt appropriate technologies related to nursery rising, cultivation, post harvest management, value addition etc and having liaison with line development agencies.

1.5.4.    Availability of Technical support for cultivation

Technical support for cultivation of medicinal plants is available in the State especially from the University of Agricultural Sciences, Krishi Vigyan Kendras, Department of Horticulture, CIMAP and reputed voluntary organisations such as FLRHT, BAIF etc. At district and taluka levels the scheme is being implemented through the technically qualified and well-versed Horticulture Officers having a keen knowledge of the said subject.

      1. Availability of quality certified planting material (cropwise, cluster/region/district-wise
Sl NoDistrictNurseryMedicinal plant speciesNo. of plants available (Nos. in lakhs)
​​​​1 ​ ​      

​​​​Bangalore Urban

 

​ ​      
Biocentre, Department of Horticulture, Amla, Stevia, Brahmi, Tinospora, Centella, Rasna, Ekanayaka, Madhunashini, Garcinia, 2.50
UAS, GKVKChandana, Stevia, Ashwagandha, Punaranava, Aloe vera, Sarpagandha, etc.2.00
CIMAPLemongrass, Amla, Brahmi, Aloevera etc.0.50
FRLHTBrahmi, Bael, Centalla, Ashwagandha, Raktha chandana, Phyllanthus etc.2.00
IIHRAmla, Ashwagandha, Mucuna, Aloevera etc.0.50
Dhanwantri vanaBrahmi, Centalla, Aloevera, Phyllanthus, etc0.20
​​2      ​​Tumkur      BAIFAmla, Aloe vera, Gymmenma, Vettivar, 0.50
Sai Krishi GardenAmla, Sweet flag, Tulsi, Brahmi etc.0.70
Forest Department, DevarayanadurgaAmla, Chandana1.00
Forest Department, SidrabettaBrahmi, Shivani, Chandana, Thare, Alale0.50
4ShimogaSri Annapoorneswari Tunga Horticulture FarmKokum, Stevia, Patchouli, Sandal, Arjuna, Amla etc 1.00
5BelgaumCollege of Horticulture, Arbhavi, Horticulture farm, Hidkal damColeus, Aswagandha, Brahmi, Amla, Aloevera, Gymnema, Tusi, Sarpagandha0.50
6KoppalHorticulture farm, MunirabadBrahmi, Senna, Amla, Aswagandha0.20
7Dakshina KannadaJeevaka Organic and Herbal Society, Karje, Chandan, Salacia, Garcinia, Celastrus, Arjuna, Alale, Amla etc. (about 210 sp)1.00
​8 ​ ​​Udupi ​ ​Annapurna Nursery, Pethri, UdupiChandan, Guggul, Rudrakshi, Salacia, Garcinia, Arjuna, Ashoka, Gulimavu, Sappan, Bilva etc.1.00
Pilikula Nisargadhama, MangaloreSalacia, Garcinia, Celastrus, Chandan, Arjuna, Amla etc0.50
Green fingers, UdupiAlale, Celastrus, Salacia, Garcinia, Chandan, Arjuna, Amla etc.0.50
9KodaguHorticulture farmPippali, Garcinia0.50
10HassanAgriculture CollegeStevia, Chandana, Amla0.10
​11
Uttara Kannada  Vanashree, SiddapurPatchouli, Chandana etc.0.30
Sri Aroma Nursery, Ankola TqSalacia, Patchouli, Stevia etc.0.50
12MysoreKarnataka Soaps and Detergents LtdSandalwood2.00
 Total​19.30

 

2.                  SWOT Analysis with respect to project area/state

STRENGTH

  • Karnataka, blessed with a variety of climatic conditions is one of the immensely potential states for the development of medicinal plants.
  • The tropical forests of Western Ghats and decidous forests of Deccan Plateau are rich in medicinal plants biodiversity with more than 2500 species.
  • The tropical forests of Western Ghats and decidous forests of Deccan Plateau are rich in medicinal plants biodiversity with more than 2500 species.
  • Well informed farmers, scientific farming, trading and processing community.
  • Well established R & D support from reputed institutions such as University of Agriculture Sciences (UAS), Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants (CIMAP), Indian Institute of Horticulture Research (IIHR), Biocentre etc.

WEAKNESS

  • Inadequate information on International demand and marketing.
  • Inadequate post harvest facilities including drying, packaging and storage.
  • High capital investment for procurement and processing.
  • Inadequate researches on key areas like post harvest, handling, processing and value addition.
  • Narrow genetic base for planting materials.

OPPORTUNITIES

  • Increasing global demand for plant based herbal medicines.
  • Willingness of private and public sector agencies to promote agro export
  • Expanding market for organic plant based products.
  • Opening up of world trade.
  • Willingness of investors on procurement and processing units

THREAT

  • Hidden market
  • High fluctuations in international price.
  • Vagaries of nature.

     

3.   Details of Annual Action Plan

3.1. Objective and strategy:

As given in the scheme of National Mission on Medicinal Plants.

OBJECTIVES:

  • Support cultivation of medicinal plants which is the key to integrity, quality, efficacy and safety of the AYUSH systems of medicines by integrating medicinal plants in the farming systems, offer an option of crop diversification and enhance incomes of farmers.
  • Cultivation following Good Agricultural and Collection Practices (GACPs) to promote standardisation and quality assurance and thereby enhance acceptability of AYUSH systems globally and increase exports of value added items like herbal exracts, phytochemicals, dietary supplements, cosmeceuticals and AYUSH products.
  • Support setting up of processing zones/clusters through covergence of cultivation, warehousing, value addition and marketing and development of infrastructure for entrepreneurs to set up units in such zones/clusters.
  • Implement and support certification mechanism for quality standards, Good Agriculture Practices (GAP), Good Collection Practices (GCP), and Good Storage Pratices (GSP).
  • Adopt a Mission mode approach and promote partnership, covergence and synergy among stakeholders involved in R & D, processing and marketing in public as well as private sector at national, regional, state and sub-state level.

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

  • The Mission would adopt an end-to-end approach covering production, post harvest management, processing and marketing.  This will be achieved by promoting cultivation of medicinal plants in identified clusters/zones within selected districts of states having potential for medicinal plants cultivation and to promote such cultivation following Good Agriculture and Collection Practices (GACPs) through synergistic linkage with production and supply of quality planting material, processing, quality testing, certification, warehousing and marketing for meeting the demands of the AYUSH industry and for exports of value added items.
  • The Mission also seeks to promote medicinal plants as a crop alternative to the farmers and through increased coverage of medicinal plants and with linkages for processing, marketing and testing, offer remunerative prices to the growers/farmers.  This will also reduce pressure on forests on account of wild collection.
  • Mission seeks to adopt communication thorugh print and electronic media as a strong component of its strategy to promote integration
  • Promote and support collective efforts at cultivation and processing in clusters through Self Help Groups, growers, cooperatives/associations, producer companies and such other organisations with strong linkages to manufacturers/traders and R & D institutions.

Strategy for implementation of AAP and details at district/sub-district level and how different organisations are proposed to be brought together, convergence with other schemes.

In order to promote medicinal plants cultivation, appropriate strategies have been evolved, which would enable us to implement scheme effectively and to establish better liaison with line agencies in the State.  The main strategy for implementation of the scheme is adoption of cluster approach by involving various stakeholder which help us to create all required facilities like nurseries for genuine planting materials, technical and extension support for cultivation, establishing post harvest management facilities, marketing facilities etc.  In this regard, a Buyer and Seller meet was held on 28.01.2014 to discuss demand and supply of medicinal plants in the identified districts.

4. Implementation Agency with details like Address, Ph. Nos. and Fax, email etc.

Contact person:

Director of Horticulture
Government of Karnataka,
Biocentre, Hulimavu, Bannerghatta Road,
Bangalore 560 076 Karnataka.

Phone : 080-6582784, 26571925, Fax : 080-26584906.
email : biocente.hulimavu@gmail.com
website : www.horticulture.kar.nic.in


THRUST AREAS:

  • Production of planting materials on need base of the community as well as plant species prioritised by the mission through model nurseries.
  • Encouraging farmers for cultivating medicinal plant species that are highly endangered, in high demand and source of supply are declining.
  • In order to reduce post harvest losses right from field level to marketing stages, infrastructue required in the forms of storage godowns, drying sheds, processing units, testing laboratories etc. have been given due consideration.  Similarly, marketing aspects are given thrust.
  • Human Resource Development (HRD) Sensitisation of medicinal plants farmers for adoption of new technologies through appropraite skill oriented trainings will play a crucial role in improving productivity of medicinal plants.  Similarly, short term training for extension staff will be of great help in validating the knowleddge to the field officer.  Hence, the training components as per the guidelines have been included in the Annual Action Plan.

Following aspects considered for preparation of Action Plan 2015-16

  • The baseline survey districtwise.
  • Based on the SWOT Analysis of each district, components of the Mission relevant to the district have been given thrust.
  • Considering the view points of various stakeholders in the development of medicinal plants in the state.
  • Accordingly, physical and financial targets have been indicated.

Convergence of other schemes and programmes with NAM

As specified in the guidelines of the scheme, the various institutions/NGOs/farmers associations related to medicinal plants are crucial for implementation of the scheme.  In order to achieve high degree of success in the implementation of thes scheme and to avoid to achieve high degree of success in the implementation of the scheme and to avoid duplicity (if any) care has to be taken to converge the benefits to individual beneficiary without overlapping.

Strategy for implementing the proposed Annual Action Plan (AAP) to the Mission, would adopt and end-to-end approach covering production, post harvest management, processing and marketing.  This will be achieved by promoting cultivation of medicinal plants in identified clusters/zones within selected selected districts of states having potential for medicinal plants cultivation and to promote such cultivation following Good Agriculture and Collection Practices (GACPs) through synergistic linkage with production and supply of quality planting material, processing, quality testing, certification, warehousing and marketing for meeting the demands of the AYUSH industry and for the exports of value added items.

3.3.  Salient aspects of the Annual Action Plan and the implementation details at district/sub-district level and how different organisations are proposed to be brought together to achieve the Mission objectives.

Detailed annual action plan of the state is enclosed in Annexure-I.

3.4.  Components wise physical targets-details of nursery, cultivation cluster and units of post harvest managemnet and processing and value addition and financial outlays | nursery production of planting material.

3.4.1. Nursery:

a)     Public Sector                        Any sursery is not proposed under public/private sector

b)     Private Sector                      

3.4.2. Cultivation (Species-wise proposed area and financial outlays for different clusters.

During the year 2015-16, crops such as Sandalwood, Redsanders, Ashwagandha, Tulsi, Coileus, Aloe vera, Kalmegh, Senna, Amla, Stevia, Accorcus calamus, Muccunna prurita, Safemusli are proposed for cultivation.  Details are provided in Annexure-I.

3.4.2.1. Identification of Area/Cluster

Clusters in districts of Karnataka have already been identified for implementation of the scheme, which are identified mainly on the basis of crops suitability, need of the community and availability of infrastructure for processing and marketing etc.

3.4.2.2. Crops to be cultivated, basis for selecting the specific species with respect to suitability to the area.

The basis for selecting the specific medicinal plants species would be as follows:

  • Medicinal plant species which are in demand in market.
  • Suitability of plant species which refers to climatic condition, soil type and rainfall for cultivation.
  • Less cost of cultivation and more returns.
  • Availability of infrastructure for storage, processing and easy access to markets.

3.4.2.3 Whether species identified based on market demand.

Yes.

3.4.2.4. Only crops included in the operational guidelines (Annexure II of the Scheme)

Yes.

3.4.2.5 Species-wise Area proposed in clusters/Districts

Sl NoPlant speciesArea (ha.)Name of districts
1Sandalwood51Kolar, Udupi, Chitradurga, Mysore
2Rakthachandan17Kolar, Chitradurga
3Ashwagandha161Gadag, Gulbarga, Chamarajanagar
5Tulsi70Bellary, Gadag, Chamarajnagar
6Coleus4Chamarajanagar
7Aloevera19Gadag, Chamarajanagar
8Senna25Bellary
9Stevia10Chamarajanagar
10Acorus calamus11.60Tumkur, Chamarajanagar
11Muccuna prurita24Gadag, Chamarajnagar
12Safedmusli10Gulbarga

 

3.4.2.6. Details of location/Districts of clusters identified

Clusters identified for cultivation of medicinal plants are Kolar, Gadag, Gulbarga, Chamarajanagar, Mandya, Bellary, Tumkur, Udupi, Chitradurga, Mysore Districts.

3.4.2.7            Organisation identifed for managing the clusters

Department of Horticulture, Government of Karnataka

3.4.2.8            Financial outlays based on subsidy pattern.

Rs. 93.968 lakhs (for cultivation only)

3.4.2.8. Financial outlays based on subsidy pattern.

3.4.3. Storage/warehousing/drying/grading sheds/processing unit/quality testing laboratory/support for quality testing.

a) Storage/warehousing : During 2015-16 it is proposed to establish 4 no. storage godowns in Gadag district.

b) Drying/grading sheds: During 2015-16 it is proposed to establish 3 no. drying/grading sheds in Gadag district.

c) Processing unit : Nil.

d) Quality testing laboratory : Nil

3.4.4. Marketing : Nil

3.4.5. Certification and insurance : Nil

3.5 Linkages

3.5.1. With R & D institutions/facilitation centres

In order to bridge the gap between farmers and research and development institutions for providing technical information and extension support on cultivation, processing and marketing of medicinal plants in the stae, the Department of Horticulture is having constant linkage with the following research and development institutions/agencies.

  • University of Horticultural Sciences, Bagalkot
  • University of Agriculture Sciences, Bangalore and Dharwad
  • Central Institute for Medicinal and Aromatic Plants (CIMAP), Bangalore
  • Indian Institute of Horticulture Research (IIHR), Bangalore.
  • Research Division, Department of Forest, Bangalore.
  • Foundation for Revitalisation of Local Health Traditions (FRLHT), Bangalore.

3.5.2. With AYUSH industry cluster scheme.

3.5.3. With National Horticulture Mission.

3.5.4. With Manufacturing units/traders for marketing.

The processing units namely Himalayan drugs, Natural Remedies, Semi Lab, Prakruti Pvt Ltd, Sadvaidya Shala, Phaladhai Foundation have been invovled in processing of raw materials on a larger scale and encouraging farmers to take cultivation of medicinal plants in the State.

4.0. Mission Management

As per the operational guidelines of the National Mission on Medicinal Plants, 5% of the total outlay of the action plan which amounts to Rs.6.8635 lakhs is proposed as management support.

4.1. Project Management Consultant

It is proposed to appoint one Project Management Consultant on contractual basis at State Project Unit during 2015-16.

4.2. Salary of contractual staff, monitoring, travel and other administrative expenses.

The scheme will be implemented by involving the staff of Department of Horticulture working at district and state level.  Therefore, it is proposed to appoint suitable manpower on contract basis (at State Project Unit if required), to meet administrative/management expenses like computer and computer accessories, stationery, vehicle hiring, telephones etc.  Project management fund will also be utilised for supporting district cluster level institutions to meet administrative/management expenses.

Annexure-I

Annual Action Plan for the year 2015-16

(Rs. in lakhs)

​Sl No ​ ​​Components ​ ​​Unit ​ ​​Subsidy amount ​ ​Total ​
Target ​​
PhysicalFianncial
  1. ​​​​​CULTIVATION
i.Crops for 75% subsidy
1Sandalwood (Santalum album Linn)Ha.0.44193755222.9808
2Raktachandan (Pierocarpos santalalinus)Ha.0.5127375189.2293
​​Sub total – 1 ​ ​ ​7032.210
ii.Crops for 30% subsidy
1AshwagandhaHa.0.0907516114.6108
2TulsiHa.0.10890707.6230
3ColeusHa.0.1560940.6244
4Aloe veraHa.0.154275192.9312
5Andrographis (Kalmeg)Ha.0.09075161.4520
6SennaHa.0.09075262.3595
7AmlaHa.0.23595286.6066
8SteviaHa.1.1343751011.3428
9Acorus calamus (Bach)Ha.0.22687511.62.6318
10Mucunna PruritaHa.0.0726231.6698
11SafedmusliHa.1.1343751011.3438
​  Sub total 2   378.663.196
  Grand Total (1+ 2)Ha.0.0726231.6698
  Grand total – cultivation (1 +2)  448.695.407
​​B. POST HARVEST MANAGEMENT ​ ​ ​
  c)    Private sector    
 ​Drying sheds/godownsNos.5.00735
  Sub total – 4  735
  1. ​​MANAGEMENT SUPPORT @ 5% of the cost of the Project
Districts ​Nos.  0.800
Biocentre, Hulimavu, Bangalore ​   6.608
​Sub total – 5 ​ ​  6.8625
​GRAND TOT​​AL (Sub total 1 to 5) ​455.6137.27